Newborn Saga: A Tale of True Africa

Personally, I’ve always been a big fan of Newborn Saga. The talents at Peda Studios make true on their promise to showcase Africa in her former majesty and glory! They not only do this beautifully, they do so in the grandest manner conceivable!  Continue reading “Newborn Saga: A Tale of True Africa”

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COMIC REPUBLIC’S SCION IS AN AFRICAN STORY OF IMMORTAL WARRIORS

What if you were an African warrior that could not die, who would you sell your services to? This is what Scion is about, in a nutshell. Scion: Immortal, is one of Comic Republic‘s newest titles alongside Beatz and Visionary.

After two issues, Scion appears to be quite consistent in its releases compared to other series published by the CR label. I really hope it stays like this because we need consistency in this budding African comics industry. Without further delay, allow me to dissect this piece of art, and give you a reason to either follow the series or let it sink into oblivion. Muhahahahaha!

Continue reading “COMIC REPUBLIC’S SCION IS AN AFRICAN STORY OF IMMORTAL WARRIORS”

Africa Needs Warriors And Not Superheroes

It’s a beautiful day in the park and everything is going just fine. Kids are flying their kites, old buddies laugh as they reminisce the good old days. There’s a teenage couple making out in one corner and forcing the singles to either look on enviously or cringe in disapproval thinking,  sheesh, can’t they get a room already?!

Then suddenly, boom! You look around and it’s this whack job with crazed out powers ranting on about his superiority and blasting everything, and everyone in sight. He notices a scared and lost looking little girl. He slowly moves towards her while the crowd flees in selfish terror and you can’t help but empathize with the little girl. All hope is lost. Or is it?

A quick blur strikes back against the villain out of nowhere! You turn around and before you is somebody in colorful spandex, buffed up and if you’re lucky, probably rocking a cape – a mask could work as well.

He looks a tad scrawny, but cape or not, you know he’s gonna deal a beating beyond any creature’s pain threshold. Oh he’s so gonna help that whack job with a GPS to jail.

Cool story but one problem, you conclude. Does Africa need this? Continue reading “Africa Needs Warriors And Not Superheroes”

Ireti Bidemi – A Female Hero Challenging Stereotypes

How many female superheroes do you know that originate from Africa and fight crime with ancestral powers? None? Not anymore. Meet Ireti BidemiContinue reading “Ireti Bidemi – A Female Hero Challenging Stereotypes”

Painting the Days – These are Creo’s 7 Ghanaian Goddesses

7 Goddesses in their elements
A Goddess a Day makes the world tick

I doubt sheer creative tenacity alone drove Creo Concept to create the visually stimulating depictions of Ghanaian female day names. Rather, I presume it was their passion to showcase our beautiful culture as much as it was to promote the ever expanding Ghanaba movement’s online presence.

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My curiosity was piqued after seeing a few illustrations that the company had shared. Creo’s manner of teasing was truly effective in heightening fan anticipation for subsequent illustrations and accompanying interpretations.

Adwoa
Adwoa

The Creo team’s artistry is appealing, their color compositions are fluid and their characters are nicely shaped, with easily identifiable elements characteristic of African women.

Abena
Abena

Their settings are easily identifiable and show these goddesses in their elements, doing things any girl on the continent and in the diaspora can relate to, one way or another.

Akua
Akua

The settings seamlessly blend the characters’ activities and mannerisms, easily evoking pride and nostalgia. Overall, the profound beauty of Creo’s characters is irresistibly endearing, much like ants in a candy shop.

Yaa
Yaa

While I may not agree with all the interpretations, I must say some are certainly true to the letter.

Afia
Afia

I do not  intend to delve into the meaning of the names but rather, to appreciate and share what I call, “feel-good” art. An exploration of the meanings can be saved for another post or deduced here.

Ama
Ama

I believe art demands more reverence than life does because of it’s longevity, the multiple stories it tells and the many lives it impacts. This belief pegs the Creo team as illustrators of extraordinary gifts, whose talents can be trusted to produce a circle of multi-dimensional characters, complex enough to boldly depict Ghanaian and African realism and thus make art an essential part of life.

Akosua
Akosua

I applaud Creo’s wonderful work and can’t wait to see the god (male) series.

Kofi Asare

Edited by Kadi Yao Tay