Conversations With Juni Ba On His Afrofuturist Space Adventure Comic Kayin And Abeni

It’s always exciting to see African comics evolve away from the superhero genre into more imaginative and artistically daring terrain. Comics such as Wrath House by the Kalu brothers, Kudzai Gumbo’s Paper Angels, Nkarim Chronicles, Setor Fiadzigbey’s Lake of Tears, Collyde Prime’s Misfits, Fumar Mota’s Disciples and Paul Louise-Julie’s Yohance among others capture this quite beautifully. Continue reading “Conversations With Juni Ba On His Afrofuturist Space Adventure Comic Kayin And Abeni”

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Money Making Opportunity For African Comic Makers

Ayodele Elegba, founder of the Lagos Comic Con recently announced a mouth-watering opportunity for not one, but thirty (30) comic book creators across Africa! Continue reading “Money Making Opportunity For African Comic Makers”

Lake of Tears: The Graphic Novel Exploring Child Trafficking On The Volta Lake

Ask me to name 5 African comics off the top of my head in a minute and I’ll name more than 10 in less that time. Ask me about Ghanaian comics however and I’ll be found wanting. Thankfully, Setor Fiadzigbey’s Lake of Tears graphic novel is helping change that.  Continue reading “Lake of Tears: The Graphic Novel Exploring Child Trafficking On The Volta Lake”

Help Design The December Edition Of The Kugali Magazine

To celebrate the Christmas edition of the Kugali Magazine, Kugali is running a competition inviting artists to design the front cover for the next edition of the Kugali Magazine.

Winner gets $125 in cash, $100 for 2nd place and $75 for 3rd place. Here are the front covers from the two previous editions as well as the characters that are set to feature in this 3rd edition.

Finally, here’s a picture of our Kugali Masks (including them in your art is optional). Plenty of inspiration for you to come up with your design.

Now just a few rules:

  1. Post your entry on Facebook or Instagram and tag Kugali in the post.
  2. Use the hashtag #KugaliMagazine
  3. Winner will be decided by popular vote. To make things easy, we’ll equate this to likes.
  4. The deadline is the 3oth of November.

For more design inspiration, check out the slideshow below with artwork by Juni Ba.

That’s all folks. Happy drawing!

Squirt Creativity!

Rankuwa: Music, Cyborgs And Unlikely Friendships

It’s one thing to live as a young music-loving cyborg in a dystopian cyberpunk world and another to have your dreams literally stolen. To keep on believing and dreaming despite the odds, however, is the true show of strength and Rankuwa, the titular character in this 3D animated short embodies that spirit.

 


Interestingly, Rankuwa means “we are taken” and in this context, could be a metaphor for how deeply rooted our lives are into technology and vice versa. (Is this far-fetched? Tell us in the comments).

 


This moving animated short is about a young boy getting through life by playing his music and the unlikely friend he makes along the way. The animated short was created by a team of students in their final year of study at the Animation School based in Cape Town and Johannesburg, South Africa sometime in 2016.

According to the school’s website, “The Animation School is South Africa’s leading provider of higher education in the field of animation as we consistently produce award-winning graduates who are employed by top companies locally and abroad.

If you’re interested in studying animation, the Animation School’s introductory video might be all the convincing you need. Watch it below.

Visit The Animation School South Africa for further details.

Rankuwa was created by the talented team of Sandro Pellarini, Farron Swartz, Tess McGraw, Jani van den Berg, Matthew Hardaker, Robin Myles, and Jason Finklestein!

This animated short film production has been created by students of The Animation School in their final year of study.


Gleaned from CG Africa.

Why African Animation Has Proven To Have Local Appeal

As seen on media update with slight modifications (context, links and video insertions), November 13, 2017. Interview by Adam Wakefield.

We’re big animation fans, more so for African animation. Thankfully, we’re not the only ones as this article sourced from media update shows. Enjoy.


The Fupitoons Film Festival: Made in Africa for Kids recently showed what local African content is made of at Discop Johannesburg 2017, proving that local stories play well with local audiences.  Continue reading “Why African Animation Has Proven To Have Local Appeal”

Are You Prepared For The Social Media Zombie Apocalypse?

Mobile phones and social media, for good or bad are here to stay and could be the death of us all and Comfort Arthur’s quirky comics are out to announce it (slideshow at end of post).

First, a real life story. Continue reading “Are You Prepared For The Social Media Zombie Apocalypse?”

For Us By Us: Greg Anderson-Elysee On Creating Is’nana The Were-Spider And African Comics

Wouldn’t it be cool if Ananse, the mighty trickster god of Ashanti folklore was turned into a comic book hero? Cooler still if he was in a pickle and needed saving by one of his offspring; possibly Ntekumah or Anansewa? Or perhaps, a fictional Is’nana created by Greg Anderson-Elysee? (The second volume of is presently on Kickstarter and needs your support) Continue reading “For Us By Us: Greg Anderson-Elysee On Creating Is’nana The Were-Spider And African Comics”

Ghanaian Comics at Pa Gya! A Literary Festival In Accra

2017 has been pretty amazing so far for the African geekdom, especially where comic books are concerned. From NAICCON (Kenya), Lagos Comic Con (Nigeria), Comexposed (Zimbabwe) and the just concluded NerdCon (Ghana), these events are helping geeks find new spaces to thrive in as fans and/or creators.  Continue reading “Ghanaian Comics at Pa Gya! A Literary Festival In Accra”

#DrawingWhileBlack: Highlighting African Artists You Never Knew About

#DrawingWhileBlack is hands down one of the best trends the internet has ever seen. The hashtag trend, started by Ghanaian-American artist Annabelle, was created to appreciate and celebrate black artists worldwide. The trend did way more than that; it brought out hundreds of crazy talented artists we had absolutely no idea about. For us, the best part is that about 44% of #DrawingWhileBlack posts were from black people here in Africa! Even the tweet with the highest retweets/shares of all posts on the hashtag came from Ghanaian artist Benjamin Kwashie! *dances excitedly* Continue reading “#DrawingWhileBlack: Highlighting African Artists You Never Knew About”