November is a Celebration of African Comic Covers

We started the month on a pretty interesting note, by showcasing covers of comics from creators across the continent on our Instagram page. We will feature a comic cover, every day through the month. 

Inspired by ACCRA[dot]ALT, the covers reflect the evolution of African art into more diverse digital art forms that uphold the “a picture is worth a thousand words” mantra more than ever. Illustrators have to convey as much about their stories into a single image without being overwhelming. They’re keeping it simple and orderly.

Here’s a recap of the first week with links to read/download.

Avonome 3&4 NOV 2015 COMIC REPUBLIC.jpg

Avonome by Stanley Stanch Obende

Avonome is a fantastical story about Hilda Avonome, a reincarnated woman with no memory of her past save for her name blessed with the incredible ability to see spirits and interact with their world. Aided by a purple shapeshifting babysitter and an angel, she embarks on a mission to discover who she was and to understand her gifts, all while kicking evil spirit ass. The graphic novel draws references from Yoruba myths like the Abiku as well as Nigerian history and features some exciting character designs. You can read it here. (text credit: ACCRA[dot]ALT)

yung-hustla-1-fees-must-fall

Young Hustla by the Young Hustla Initiative

Dubbed as the “first entrepreneurship comic in the world”, Young Hustla is a comic about an ordinary Soweto kid with big dreams like everyone, who actively decides to chase them instead of blaming society, his current situation or his bad misfortune. An initiative by the Young Hustla Initiative, the comic is just one layer of plans to inspire entrepreneurship and self reliance.

The first issue explores the #FeesMustFall movement in South Africa. You can read it for free here. You however need to sign in with your Twitter account.

Shore Wanda by Movin Were

shore-wanda
Shore Wanda by Movin Were

Shore Wanda tells the story of a Kenyan woman who discovers overnight after a worldwide cataclysmic event that she’s got super powers (like the strength of a thousand men and super intelligence) and is also the last descendant of a race that’s lived alongside humans for thousands of years. Shore Wanda uses her powers for good in a world full of suffering. A world that has never accepted her.

 

agbaara-2
Agbara

 

Agbara by Chima Kalu

Illustrated and created by Chima & Kelly Kalu, Agbara tells of a fallen angel’s exploration of what it means to be human after her banishment from heaven. Her banishment is as a result of  her neutral stance in a war between Angels and Demons.

Sheba’s Song by Peter Ike Amadi

Sheba’s Song is an epic saga about two warring tribes that live on the Twin Islands of Nora and the Zili. The fragile truce between the two tribes is broken when the ferocious Zili warlord known as Ramon Kahn raises a massive army and marches them towards the holy city of Mesotho, the capital of Nora, destroying everything in his path. He has sworn to destroy the city and rape and murder the Noran queen known as the Oracle. Only the Guardians, the elite unit of the Noran army, can stop him but even they may not be enough. Sheba’s Song is an epic fantasy about honor, broken truces, war, a mother’s love, oracles, vengeance and a raging psychopath. The comic is written by Peter Ike Amadi and published by Shadow Black Entertainment and can be read here.

malika-preview

Malika: Warrior Queen by Roye Okupe

Successfully backed on Kickstarter and scheduled for release next year, Malika follows the exploits of queen and military commander who struggles to keep the peace in her ever-expanding empire while having to deal with internal politics and the threat of a most fearsome superpower from the east, the Ming Dynasty. You can follow the queen’s adventures on Facebook and glimpse her exploits in this preview.

Whoop whoop! That’s what we’ve uploaded for the first week. What comic covers would you love to see? Let us know in the comments section and do check us out on Instagram.

Peace, Squirt Creativity.

By Kadi Yao Tay.

Advertisements

One thought on “November is a Celebration of African Comic Covers

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s